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Sep 28, 2012 5:00pm EDT
intelligence estimate and an independent assessment by the national academy of sciences to assess the ability of the united states to monitor compliance with the treaty and the ability of the united states to maintain in the absence of nuclear explosive testing of safe and secure and effective nuclear arsenals so long as these weapons exist. those reports on the related material will provide a wealth of information as the senate considers the merits of the ratification of the ctbt. of course we do not expect people to be in the preseason only mode. we anticipate and look forward to many substantive questions and items of discussion and debate that will undoubtedly come from our colleagues from capitol hill. looking upward from the administration has been calling on all the remaining to join us in moving forward towards ratification. there is no reason for them to delay their own ratification process waiting for the united states to ratify. the administration realizes this will be a difficult task on many levels, but it is nonetheless committed to moving the treaty for word so as the national
Sep 27, 2012 9:00am EDT
thousand dollars and i will pay my teachers $75,000 a year too. come on. this is not rocket science. it is hard political work. the political will to meet the needs of children whose needs have never been matched is hard. >> come in. >> richard's argument is frustrating and personal honestly because their statistical likelihood of graduating high school would be less than 50% and we can say that is okay and we are making progress. that is not okay. we have to take a totally different look at what we're doing in public education and rethink it and say how the we take what we found in small isolated pockets and figure out how to get them to millions of kids who need them and that is a massive challenge. none of us are underestimating the size of this challenge. i am trying to argue we have indications of what those elements are. in new york city public schools from k-12 the personal the likelihood of me graduating with a diploma was 5%. five% of kids graduated special-education students from new york city public schools and i went on to graduate from high school and had great teachers
Sep 27, 2012 12:00pm EDT
before, is a science and technology, not for profit policy think tank, if you will for the washington, d.c., area that focuses on how science and technology affects our national security. for quite some time, we have been involved in the study of issues in and around what people call acementic threats. and most importantly terrorism. this past year, professor al sander an i realize released our second volume on al qaeda about the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11. i would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available here and on the web and amazon. all the good things. i want to highlight it today. it's one of the gifts we are going to give to the members for takes the time out of their busy schedule to join us today. i can patrol you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second work that the institute has been evolved in is the wefort the corporation to look at the cyber issue in particular cyber doctorate. that volume ed kitted by tim and i is in publication as we speak. so you a short flier of that summarizes what is in the volume. it will be out shortly
Sep 25, 2012 5:00pm EDT
thing, the importance of improving standards in the schools at all levels, particularly science and math standards because we need to make sure that our young people are not only getting a good education in those areas, but have hand-on curriculum, and that means we want to invest in the university, begin restoring cuts that the legislature made, but in exchange for that, freezing tuition at the university system, and also making sure that the university system is holding more slots open for new hampshire residents to families can afford to stay here and kids stay here to be the next generation of talent for our economy. >> good morning. >> tell me about your policy economic differences. >> well, thank you very much, first of all, not new hampshire public radio and new hampshire public television for spoon storing the first debate of the general election cycle, and i'm pleased to speak with the various media. i think the policy differences are fundamental and they are vast. when it comes to jobs in the economy and reforming state government, and that's what is on the forefront of most pe
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4